Hot Disaster Preparation Posts

How To: Start a fire with quartz

Making a fire is important in order to stay warm and more importantly stay alive. In this video tutorial you'll find out how to use a quartz, old file, and the back end of your knife to help start a fire. And again, remember that fire can be dangerous and cause major damage to not only you but to the environment. So be careful!

How To: Tie the bowline Boy Scouts knot

Learn how to tie the Boy Scouts knot the bowline. The bowline knot is used to make a non-slip loop in the end of a rope. While it is used for climbing and rescues, a Figure-8 Loop Knot often is best in those situations. Remember to end the knot with the tag end of the rope inside the loop. And thanks to those scouters and boaters who helped remind me of this point. Tie the bowline Boy Scouts knot.

How To: Tie hammock hanging knots

The knots demonstrated in this how-to video are a good way to hang a hammock, because it makes it so easy to adjust your hanging height. The whipping knot around the tree will not slip if tied correctly. Make sure to tie the second half hitch or the knot may slip and come loose. As with all knots, use your own discretion and be safe. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie some sturdy knots useful for hammock-hanging.

How To: Tie the Celtic heart knot

In this video, we learn how to tie the Celtic heart knot. Start off with your rope and make a loop in the middle of it. Now, bring the working en on the right side into the loop so you have a circle. Now, bring that end back into the knot and braid it through the other loop. Next, push this through the bottom loop, then braid it through the lines that are on the shape. After this, you will see a heart shape start to form. Pull gently on the heart with both sides of the rope and shape the midd...

How To: Tie a bloody knuckle knot

A bloody knuckle knot is the result of a row of half hitches fused with a blood knot--this video teaches you how to tie one. Make two loops with your rope then loop them over your thumb. Take the tail of the rope and keep making loops and adding them to the others on your thumb, to produce a row of loops. When you have five loops, slide them off your thumb, take the end of the rope and pass it through the loops. Pull out the slack but do not tighten, then take the other tail and pass it throu...

How To: Remove Maggots from Your Eyeball

While maggots living in human eyeballs isn't necessarily a problem in the states, it could happen to you one day if a fly decides your warm eyeball is a suitable place for its larvae. If this rare event should happen, before you start gouging your eyeball out, remember this trick from National Geographic explorer and engineer Albert Lin and everything will be okay.

How To: Make natural long burning torches in the forest

In this tutorial, we learn how to make natural long burning torches in the forest. First, use a dead tree limb and rip off all the bark that is on it. Next, gather up the bark from the tree and tie it together with wire you carry with you. Also, gather up a dead stick and connect this to the dead bark as well. Use a multi-tool to cut the wire if you are in a hurry. Once finished, light the bark on fire and you will have a natural torch that will burn in the forest! Be sure to use a dead tree ...

How To: Make a primitive wilderness loom

Staying warm is important to making sure that you survive. Whether it be the end of the world or you find yourself lost in the wilderness, keeping dry and warm is key to survival. In this two part tutorial find out how to make a primitive wilderness loom and a mat to sleep on.

How To: Start a fire with a battery and a staple

This young fellow demonstrates how to start a fire using a battery and a staple. He suggest you begin with a staple or any thin wire, a AA battery and a knife. On the negative terminal of the battery, he cuts off a piece of the insulation by following the small ring on the battery. Pay attention to the small ring between the top of the terminal and the casing. Look for the gap that has some paper material and pry that up. Insert the staple below the paper into the gap. As you move the staple,...

How To: Do a line rescue in the water as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Tie a tensioning knot

The tensioning knot, demonstrated in this how-to video, is a useful way to tie the strands of my whips to the rope machine. It is also useful anytime that quick tension is needed and a truckers hitch is too much or the distance is too short. Tie a noose in the line and snug it up then a slippery half hitch locks it in place. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a tensioning knot.

How To: Build an emergency portable car heater for emergency situations

If you've ever gotten your car stuck in a blizzard or been lost on a wilderness drive in winter, you know that keeping that car warm is vital to your comfort and even survival. Using the heater means keeping the car on though, and that means consuming precious fuel. And what if the car breaks down? Watch this video for instructions on how to make a portable emergency heater for your car that will keep it between 60-70 degrees for about 24 hours burning only rubbing alcohol. It could save your...

How To: Make a shirt out of a wool blanket

In this video, we learn how to make a shirt out of a wool blanket. This is great if you need something really warm to sleep in or wear out around. First, design the shirt so it's longer on the back than it is in the front. That way, when you sit down you will have extra wool to help keep you warm. You don't need to sew a collar on it,, because it will just take too much work. Make the arms extra long, depending on how large your blanket is. If it's too long, you can fold the ends over, or cov...

How To: Build an Emergency Rucksack with a Poncho & Rope (The Horseshoe Pack)

There’s a good chance that you’ll be alone in life one day, and no... I’m not talking about a couch-bound, dateless loser with a pocket pussy and a bag of potato chips. I’m talking about alone. In the wilderness. Hungry. Cold. Lost. You can’t stay in one place too long, so it would be nice to have something to carry your belongings in. Maybe it’s post-apocalyptic land where you’re the sole survivor, and all the backpacks and rucksacks in the world are but mere ash. Either way, knowing this si...

How To: Boil water on a leaf in the wilderness

This video shows a tip on how to boil water on a leaf in the wilderness. If you are stuck out in the wilderness and you don't have a plastic bottle for water you can use a leaf to boil water for drinking. Build a fire first. Then find a large enough leaf you can hold it over the fire without burning your hands. Fill the leaf with water and hold it over the fire. Only let the flames lick up against the leaf so it won't burn. The edges will curl up closed but the water will boil in about ninety...

How To: Hike five miles with a map and compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Complete an orienteering course as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Make a paracord using a knitting spool

This short video shows how to get started with 550 paracord and a 3 peg/nail knitting spool made from a wooden napkin ring and 3 nails. This just show you how to start. Follow these steps: After the initial wrapping of the nails with the paracord at the bottom of the nail, you take the working end to the next nail above the cord that's wrapped around it, use a hook of some type to lift the lower cord up and over the top cord and the nail. Continue from one nail to the next, up and over with t...