Hot Disaster Preparation Posts

How To: Tie a tamale knot

The Tamale was designed to hold long bundles of leather for whip braiding. It is useful for bundling larger diameter rope for use in hojojutsu or shipboard. Difficult and time consuming but it does work on lengths up to 5 fathoms. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a tamale knot.

How To: Tie a pegged slip knot

The pegged slip knot or noose, demonstrated in this how-to video, is similar to the bowline but by placing the peg loosely on the standing part the knot can be adjusted. It's a great knot for releasing quickly. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a pegged slip knot.

How To: Tie a paracord bundle

The method of rope handling demonstrated in this how-to video came from the Japanese. Pirates during the warring states period used such bundles to secure prisoners among other shipboard duties and the bundle stays alive today in hojujitsu. A few fathoms of paracord in a pocket and a handier tool aboard a boat would be hard to find. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a paracord bundle.

How To: Tie an adjustable bowline knot

This how-to video demonstrates a way of tying a bowline to adjust the snugness of the bowline on your winch or whatever you have tied it to. Tie the bowline as usual. Pull the top of the eye and the bottom of the turn apart then pull on both of the strands exiting the loop to capsize the knot. Then snug it up and reset it. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie an adjustable bowline knot.

How To: Tie a clove hitch on a carabiner

As the clove hitch knot is adjustable and slipper, it can be useful attached to a carabiner, allowing the load to move fluidly up and down the rope. However, the clove hitch is not particularly useful or advisable as a securing knot. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a clove hitch knot on a carabiner.

How To: Tie a slip bowline knot

A bowline knot can tighten up really easily, in such a way that it's a headache to get the rope untied. The slip bowline knot, however, has a pull tab that releases the knot when you're ready. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a slip bowline knot.

How To: Tie hammock hanging knots

The knots demonstrated in this how-to video are a good way to hang a hammock, because it makes it so easy to adjust your hanging height. The whipping knot around the tree will not slip if tied correctly. Make sure to tie the second half hitch or the knot may slip and come loose. As with all knots, use your own discretion and be safe. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie some sturdy knots useful for hammock-hanging.

How To: Make a hammock without sewing

No place to sleep tonight? In a pinch, a little bit of rope and some fabric can be transformed into a hammock bed. This is a great skill for camping, emergency situations, or even communal living. Make sure to use a sturdy enough cloth, and replicate these same knots so that the hammock will support the weight. Check out this video survival training tutorial and learn how to make an emergency hammock without sewing.

How To: Use a Light Bulb and the Sun to Make a Fire

Don't throw away your dead light bulbs, they may come in handy one day. This video will show you how to start a fire using a dead lightbulb. And no electricity. The tricky part is emptying out the insides, but this can be done with sticks and stones, assuming you're in a survival situation and just happen to have a light bulb with you for whatever reason.

How To: MAKE FIRE with a MAGNIFYING GLASS

90 seconds that could save your life. How to actually MAKE A FIRE with a lens, rather than just burning a hole in a leaf. (Or frying ants, which seems to be the other thing that kids like to do with magnifying glasses.) By forming your target material into an efficient ball, you will be able to start a fire even with very small lenses. Like less than an inch across small. The finer the individual fibres, and the more densely they are packed, the more effective is your ball of smigtin (smoulde...

How To: Protect Your Home from Criminals

I am the crime watch co-chairman for our neighborhood crime watch committee of our home owner's association. Instead of making a boring "do this, do that" video, I decided to make a funny video from the eyes of a criminal that specializes in stealing from homes, just like mine. This is meant to teach homeowners what to look out for when keeping their homes safe from criminals.

How To: Stay safe during a power or gas outage

There are many different things that could contribute to a power or gas outage or accident in your home. To be properly prepared for an emergency or other situations that endanger you, take a look at this video from SDGE on simple tips to keep safe, including discovering gas leaks and using power generators to maintain eletricity in your home during an outage.

May 21st: End of the World or Zombie Apocalypse?

Could the world really be coming to an end tomorrow? Presuming you believe the biblical prediction from 89-year-old Harold Camping, May 21st, 2011 is undeniably Judgment Day. If you have confidence in that prophecy, you're probably not even reading this because you're too busy either A) preparing for the Rapture or B) sitting in your backyard bunker hoping to outwit annihilationism.

How To: Measure Radiation in Japan, Plus Other Sources of Common, Everyday Intake

In the wake of the recent tragedy in Japan, Southern Californians have been hyper alert to any news regarding dangerous levels of nuclear radiation drifting over from Fukushima. At this time, official statements from the California Department of Public Health and the EPA are assuaging the population that there is nothing to fear. While there has been some detection of radiation in the air, the current levels recorded are "thousands of times below any conservative level of concern". But despit...

How To: Assemble a Survival Kit

I am writing this quick post in response to the recent earthquakes and tsunamis that are affecting Japan. As soon as the news broke, and we began to hear of tsunami warning for our area, I immediately realized how under prepared I was for a natural disaster. The thing that drove this point home even deeper was the number of people asking me for advice on what they could do to prepare for the possibility that we are hit by one of the resultant tsunamis. Many thoughts raced through my mind, and...

News: 5 Ways You Can Help Japan's Tsunami Victims Right Now, From Your Couch

A devastating tragedy occurred in Japan on Friday when a monstrous 8.9-magnitude quake hit, causing a 10 meter (33 foot) tsunami to engulf the northeastern coast of the country. There are reports of over 1,000 people who have lost their lives, tens of thousands evacuated, and massive damage. Whether you have a lot or a little to give, here are five ways you can aid in the relief effort this very moment, without even leaving your couch.

How To: Tie an Arab-style shemagh two different ways

A shemagh, or a keffiyeh, is a traditiona Arab headdress that's worn by Arab men. Made from a square scarf, it protects their heads and face from desert wind and sun. It's also multifunctional - warm at night and lightweight during the day. These scarves have even become adopted by the U.S. Cavalry to protect themselves during long treks outdoors.

How To: Make Brazilian bushcraft survival tools: coconut containers, bamboo spoons etc

Brazil is a country rich in natural resources and splendor, making it a great place for outdoor enthusiasts. If you venture into the Brazilian wilderness and find yourself in need of precious survival supplies, or just want to make some cool stuff out of exotic plants, watch this video for instructions on making Brazilian bushcrafts like coconut containers and bamboo spoons.