Hot Disaster Preparation Posts

How To: Use a map and compass tutorial

Without good navigational skills, your expedition could lead to failure or result in a dangerous situation. Try to use a laminated map which is better in wet conditions. 1:25,000 scale maps provide the greatest detail. One grid square equals 1 kilometer. Use map keys for reference. Don't mistake boundary walls for footpaths. A compass points to magnetic north and the top of the planet is called true north. Magnetic north is constantly moving and its position relative to true north is differen...

How To: Create an Ojibwa bird trap

The Pathfinder School offers bird enthusiasts this video tutorial that shows how to construct an Ojibwa Bird Trap. Using a series of sticks, anyone can learn how to create this bird trap, which works when a bird's weight triggers a snare. Learn the tips and techniques of what works and what doesn't in terms of materials to create a successful Ojibwa bird trap. The tutorial will explain what size sticks you need and how the trap should be constructed to successfully catch a bird.

How To: Create a spring spear trap

Kruder, from The Pathfinder's school, teaches you how to make a spring spear trap with almost all natural materials. This is a very dangerous trap so be warned and be very careful if you practice this. By using any springy tree (he uses a Maple), and a toggle tied to another tree, you can make a trip wire for any sized animal. Add a spear to make it more effective. You'll learn everything from the materials to construction in this video.

How To: Tie knots with the Boy Scouts

Knot tying is the one of the first steps in becoming a well rounded, successful Boy Scout. Who better to learn from than the Boy Scouts themselves? Follow along with this knot tying guide to learn how to tie several knots. Click on the right hand menu to learn the following knots:

How To: Sharpen an axe or knife with the Boy Scouts

You never know when you may need to sharpen an axe... and who better to learn from than the Boy Scouts? Brace the axe head on the ground between a log about 6" in diameter and two woooden pegs or tent stakes. Sharpen your axe with an 8-10 inch mill bastard file. Be sure to wear leather gloves. Make a knuckle guard out of leather, plywood, or an old inner tube. Place the file on the edge of the blade and push it into the bit. Lift the file as you draw back for each stroke. Turn the axe around ...

How To: Orient a map and use a compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Hike five miles with a map and compass as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Rescue someone in the water as a Boy Scout

Second Class Boy Scouts work on building their outdoor survival and camping skills. Compass work, nature observation, camp tools, and swimming are areas where new skills are mastered and demonstrated. A second class scout, having completed all the requirements, should be able to lead a hike, care for his own equipment, set up a campsite, and perform basic first aid.

How To: Complete an orienteering course as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Prepare and cook a meal as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Discuss constitutional rights as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Use and not use lashings as a Boy Scout

As a Boy Scout, when the First Class rank is attained, a scout has learned all the basic camping and outdoors skills of a scout. He can fend for himself in the wild, lead others on a hike or campout, set up a camp site, plan and properly prepare meals, and provide first aid for most situations he may encounter. A First Class scout is prepared.

How To: Tie the Double Loop Bowline knot

The Double Loop Bowline: learn knot tying. Here's another way to tie a bowline in a doubled rope. The Double Loop Bowline knot was generally used at sea for lowering an injured man from aloft, by putting one leg is put through each loop. Use this knot tying animation to learn how to tie the Double Loop Bowline knot. Tie the Double Loop Bowline knot.

How To: Tie a hasty webbing harness for search & rescue

Handy technique for search & rescue, learn how to tie a hasty webbing harness with this knot tying animation. This animated knot tying tutorial is the best you'll find. With this knot tying how to, you can tie the Hasty Webbing Harness Knot fast or slow, or pause it at every step along the way. Learn to tie knots for your next outdoor trip. Tie a hasty webbing harness for search & rescue.

How To: Tie a tamale knot

The Tamale was designed to hold long bundles of leather for whip braiding. It is useful for bundling larger diameter rope for use in hojojutsu or shipboard. Difficult and time consuming but it does work on lengths up to 5 fathoms. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a tamale knot.

How To: Tie a version of the pegged bowline knot

Check out this video to learn how to tie another version of the pegged bowline. In this case, the running end of the rope is run around behind the standing part as though it were going to be finished in the usual manner, but is instead pegged on the loop. Watch this video knot tying tutorial and learn how to tie a version of the pegged bowline knot.

How To: Tie knots to hang an easy hammock

This how-to video demonstrates the easiest way to make a hammock. Simple, easy and safe, with no sewing required, make a hammock anytime in a pinch. All you need is fabric, rope, and the knot-tying skills from this instructional video. Watch this video tutorial and learn how to make an easy hammock.

How To: Tie a variation of the double bowline knot

The Double Bowline has the same strength as a figure eight knot but is simpler to tie. This variation of the double bowline knot differs from the original in that the end of the rope doubles back to go the same direction as the length, instead of hanging down into the loop. Watch this video knot-tying tutorial and learn how to tie a variation of the double bowline knot.

How To: Tie a Bowline Knot

The bowline knot has a long history in sailing. The bowline, or bow line, knot was used to secure the sail in position toward the back of the ship, allowing the sail to capture the wind. Contemporarily, the bowline knot is used anytime a strong, looped knot is required. Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a bowline knot.

How To: Use dandelion tinder to make a fire

Need to make a survival fire, but don't have any matches and your lighter is out of fluid. Fear not, this how-to video can help. An empty flintwheel lighter can save the day when you need a fire. Dandelion seed puffs can be the perfect tinder for your spark. Watch this video tutorial to see how it works & learn a great survival tip.

How To: Make a tin can survival cook stove

This is a how-to on how to make a survival cook stove instead of spending $25 to buy one online. It is a simple projecting that requires an old can, a pair of scissors, and a knife. Be careful and pay attention to his excellent instructions! Watch this video survival training tutorial and learn how to build a cook stove out of a tin can.

How To: Remove Maggots from Your Eyeball

While maggots living in human eyeballs isn't necessarily a problem in the states, it could happen to you one day if a fly decides your warm eyeball is a suitable place for its larvae. If this rare event should happen, before you start gouging your eyeball out, remember this trick from National Geographic explorer and engineer Albert Lin and everything will be okay.

How To: MAKE FIRE with a MAGNIFYING GLASS

90 seconds that could save your life. How to actually MAKE A FIRE with a lens, rather than just burning a hole in a leaf. (Or frying ants, which seems to be the other thing that kids like to do with magnifying glasses.) By forming your target material into an efficient ball, you will be able to start a fire even with very small lenses. Like less than an inch across small. The finer the individual fibres, and the more densely they are packed, the more effective is your ball of smigtin (smoulde...